Archive | Indians in Missouri & Arkansas

Talking Ourselves Into Hatred: the Arkansas Cherokees

“What is civilization?” wrote Nu-Tah-E-Tuil, or “No-Killer,” in an April, 1828, letter to the Arkansas Gazette. “Is it a practical knowledge of agriculture? Then I am willing to compare the farms and gardens of this nation with those of the mass of white population in the Territory.   The advantage will be on our side.  Does civilization consist […]

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Becoming “Us” by Getting Rid of “Them”

In a time of tumultuous change, as its society was being transformed by new means of transportation, increased access to information, and an avalanche of settlers, on August 10, 1821, Missouri became a state.  Its new status marked the end of the era of multicultural tolerance in the Mississippi valley. The new settlers considered themselves […]

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The Indian Nations, Moving Endlessly West

When the French explorers Jacques Marquette and Louis Joliet first arrived on the Great Plains in 1673, they encountered a tribe who may themselves have arrived only shortly before.  The Osage had moved west from the Ohio valley over the previous century, because of a long series of conflicts with the Iroquois.  They were a […]

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