Archive | November, 2015

What You Can Learn from Old Documents

What can you say about a group of obscure backwoodsmen who left no letters, no diaries, and hardly any wills, who were not even important enough to be included in local county histories?  How can you make their lives and their world come to life? The ancient records of county courts, registries of deeds, and […]

Share
Continue Reading 0

An Anglican Missionary Sees the Danger

Charles Woodmason, an itinerant Anglican minister whose travels took him across the Carolina backcountry in the years before the Revolution, saw the danger clearly.  The religious radicals, he said, had poisoned “the Minds of the People—Instilling  Democratical and Common Wealth Principles into their Minds…. And laying deep their fatal Republican Notions and Principals. Especially – […]

Share
Continue Reading 0

Forgotten History: The Baptist Battle for Separation of Church and State

The year was 1784.  In the aftermath of the Revolution, as morality and public order appeared to be crumbling on all sides, the Virginia General Assembly proposed to shore them up with a new tax, designed to support the “teachers of religion.”  Any religion you want – the taxpayer got to choose. During the summer […]

Share
Continue Reading 0

When the Quakers became Baptists

The Black Creek Baptist Church was established in Southampton County, Virginia, during or shortly after the Revolution, on the same small creek where a Quaker Meeting had been established several years before.  Like all other early Baptist churches, it had both white and black members.  The church records show that the members considered complaints by […]

Share
Continue Reading 0

Forgotten History: The Radical Baptists

Until the 1770s, when the Quakers suddenly turned against slavery, Virginia’s Anglican elites had more or less made up their minds to tolerate them.  But the Separate Baptists sowed terror in Anglican souls. The Baptists arrived in Virginia in two streams, the Regular and the Separate Baptists, beginning in the mid-1750s.  All of them shared […]

Share
Continue Reading 0